Anti-Aging Effects of Meditation

By | August 9, 2017
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Enriching emotional balance is a challenge in our normally imbalanced, imperfect, and stressful world. The ancient masters developed the potent techniques of meditation and yoga to enrich the state of mindfulness and emotional balance.

Asking people about their meditation experiences can teach newcomers and experienced practitioners so much about the great influence of meditation. Daily meditation practice incorporates many skills: clear thinking, problem-solving, and focus. Meditation also increases energy and reduces negative emotions like anxiety. The benefits of meditation and yoga are scientifically proven and have positive effects on the physiological structure of the brain, personality changes, as well as aging. Why should we meditate every day? Meditation trains your mind. As with any skill, in order to succeed you need frequent practice. Practicing meditation for 5-10 minutes every day will have more effect on your body than exercising for 1 hour a week.

Science has shown that there is a protective influence on structural changes in the brain, i.e., loss of gray matter, which is a process involved in aging. This means that when you meditate, you slow the aging process of your brain.

Studies have also stated through meditation we can see the improvement of endocrine balance, decreasing of oxidative stress, and the protection of telomere. Epel et. al.state:“We have reviewed data linking stress arousal and oxidative stress to telomere shortness. Meditative practices appear to improve the endocrine balance toward positive arousal (high DHEA, lower cortisol) and decrease oxidative stress Thus; meditation practices may promote mitotic cell longevity both through decreasing stress hormones and oxidative stress and increasing hormones that may protect the telomere.”Telomere is a repeating sequence of double-stranded DNA located at the ends of chromosomes. Each time a cell divides, the telomeres become shorter. Eventually, the telomeres become so short that the cell can no longer divide.”

In the article “Why are we aging – scientific insights” we learned that our endocrine system plays a crucial role in our appearance and the aging process. The prevention of the oxidative stress that damages our cells is a guard against aging process. When we meditate, we become more stress-resistant. Thus we avoid a shortage of telomere (i.e., one of the cellular processes responsible for aging). Therefore, meditation protects us from cell damage, premature aging, and various chronical diseases and when we practice meditation for an extended period, we not only improve our abilities but we become more successful, kind, mindful, and happy. With meditation, we support our brain cells, our endocrine system, and our body as a whole prolonging our youth and living longer.

You hold the power to your emotional and physical health!

Start meditating today! Get guided information from the following Meditation Apps: 

Get information from the following YouTube Video:

Spiritual Reality Power Of Meditation

If you prefer to be taught and guided by a meditation directly, you can find a meditation coach or teacher on the Expert List

 

References:

  • http://nccih.nih.gov/health/meditation/overview.htm
  • http://www.ucsf.edu/news/2013/09/108886/lifestyle-changes-may-lengthen-telomeres-measure-cell-aging
  • Luders, E., Cherbuin, N., & Kurth, F. (2015). Forever Young(er): Potential age-defying effects of long-term meditation on gray matter atrophy. Frontiers in Psychology Front. Psychol., 5.
  • Kurth, Florian; Cherbuin, Nicolas; Luders, Eileen (2015). “Reduced age-related degeneration of the hippocampal subiculum in long-term meditators.” Psychiatry Research232 (3): 214–8. 
  • Epel E, Daubenmier J, Moskowitz JT, Folkman S, Blackburn E (August 2009). “Can meditation slow rate of cellular aging? Cognitive stress, mindfulness, and telomeres”Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci1172: 34 53.
  • Luders, E., Cherbuin, N., & Kurth, F. (2015). Forever Young(er): Potential age-defying effects of long-term meditation on gray matter atrophy. Frontiers in Psychology Front. Psychol., 5.
  • Kurth, Florian; Cherbuin, Nicolas; Luders, Eileen (2015). “Reduced age-related degeneration of the hippocampal subiculum in long-term meditators.” Psychiatry Research232 (3): 214–8.
  • Epel E, Daubenmier J, Moskowitz JT, Folkman S, Blackburn E (August 2009). “Can meditation slow rate of cellular aging? Cognitive stress, mindfulness, and telomeres”Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci1172: 34 53.

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